Google+ Followers

Saturday, April 12, 2014

Ramona Africa : Last Survivor of MOVE



The Opperman Report
Freedomslips.com Studio A
5:00 PM PST 8:00 EST 4/11/2014


On a Move – Website of the MOVE Organization



]

MOVE or the MOVE Organization is a Philadelphia-based black liberation group founded by John Africa. MOVE was described by CNN as "a loose-knit, mostly black group whose members all adopted the surname Africa, advocated a peaceful but revolutionary 'back-to-nature' lifestyle.
The group lived peacefully communally and frequently engaged in public demonstrations related to issues of social and economic justice.
Since their founding in 1972, MOVE has been targeted by the Philadelphia Police Department. A major incident occurred in 1978, when the police unlawfully raided their Powelton Village home. This raid resulted in the imprisonment of nine group members, now known as the "MOVE 9." After this, the group relocated further west to a house at 6221 Osage Avenue.

In 1985 the group made national news when police dropped a bomb on the Osage house from a helicopter. The explosion and ensuing fire killed 11 innocent people, including five children and the group's leader, John Africa. Only two occupants survived—Ramona, an adult and Birdie, a child. In addition, approximately 60 other (non MOVE-affiliated) homes were destroyed as the entire block burned.
Police and firefighters standing by watching innocent people burn to death and an entire neighborhood destroyed.




Let the Fire Burn movie ad
“This MASTERPIECE about an astounding and forgotten moment in recent American history SHOULD BE SEEN FAR AND WIDE.” – Filmmaker Magazine
“Has THE FORCE AND INTRIGUE of a courtroom thriller…Ripples with URGENCY and MORAL COMPLEXITY.”
In the astonishingly gripping Let the Fire Burn, director Jason Osder has crafted that rarest of cinematic objects: a found-footage film that unfurls with the tension of a great thriller. On May 13, 1985, by order of local Philadelphia authorities, police dropped military-grade explosives onto a MOVE-occupied rowhouse. TV cameras captured the conflagration that quickly escalated–and resulted in the tragic deaths of eleven people (including five children) and the destruction of 61 homes. It was only later discovered that authorities decided to “…let the fire burn.” Using only archival news coverage and interviews, first-time filmmaker Osder has brought to life one of the most tumultuous and largely forgotten clashes between government and citizens in modern American history. See trailer and read more at http://letthefireburn.com.
Playing now in many states, check out show dates near you!
 











No comments:

Post a Comment